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Timber’s Dead End Road?

Posted by Renee Magyar on July 19, 2012

We must help timber communities flourish to restore the health and resilience of forests, watersheds and wildlife habitats.

Hayfork-post-and-pole

Letters to the editor: Martin Goebel

Oregonian (Published with the title "Restoration forestry")

July 19, 2012

Regarding the editorial "Timber's dead-end road" (July 14): We must help timber communities flourish. This time, though, we should do it not to meet "harvest targets" but to restore the health and resilience of forests, watersheds and wildlife habitats. Fire season is upon us, and already we see signs of devastating wildfires because forests are unnaturally overstocked.

Many communities in eastern Oregon are innovating their way into "restoration forestry," with new jobs and facilities that add value to the wood that must be culled from the forest to increase its health. To write them off is to ignore the imperative we must all support for the future of Oregon as a whole. We all reap the "harvest" from forest health -- clean air, water, abundant wildlife and landscapes that define our love of place. 

As rural Oregonians continue to innovate the way they manage our forests and wood products, their efforts must not be overlooked. 

Martin Goebel

President of Sustainable Northwest